2nd Foot Guards

Commanded by John Cutts

Previously known as 'the Lord General's regiment'. A.k.a. as 'Coldstream Guard'

Commanded by:
George Monck Duke of Albemarle 26 August 16501
William Earl of Craven 6 January 16702
Thomas Tollemache 1 May 16893
John Cutts 3 October 16944
Charles Churchill 1707
William Earl of Cadogan 1714

The first colonel of this regiment5 was General George Monck Duke of Albemarle. This royalist6 had been taken prisoner in 1644 and had switched to the parliamentary side. In 1650 he accepted command of this new regiment that was formed by taking 10 companies from two other regiments. This regiment then entered Scotland in Cromwell's army in July 1650. Here it participated in the September 1650 battle of Dunbar. It was probably in 1651 that Monck became supreme commander in Scotland. The regiment was besieging Stirling Castle when Cromwell's main force beat the king at Worcester. In August Stirling Castle was taken and the regiment captured Dundee. In May 1652 it then captured Dunottar castle, but was afterwards occupied till July 1654 in putting down a Royalist uprising in the Highlands.

In September 1658 Oliver Cromwell died and in the confusing times that followed Monck started his march from Coldstream to London by crossing the Tweed on 1 January 1660. After taking power there Charles II was restored and Monck became Captain General and the Lord General's own regiments of Horse and Foot were the only ones that were not disbanded. On 14 February 1661 the regiment was then disbanded and immediately reconstituted as a 'guard' regiment7. (That same day Monck's horse regiment was also disbanded and raised as a troops of horse guards) At the death of Monck on 3 January 1670 he was succeeded by William Earl of Craven. The Coldstream then participated in the August 1678 battle of Saint Denis. In 1685 it was in the battle of Sedgemoor. After William's takeover in 1688 the Coldstream Guards were sent out of London. William Earl of Craven8 was dismissed.

The second regiment of Foot Guards during the Nine Years War

When William III came to power in England he appointed Thomas Tollemache (also called Talmash, which seems to have been the French version of his name) as colonel on 1 May 1689. Previously he had been colonel of one of the regiments in Dutch service. In January the Coldstream Guards were ordered to sail to Hellevoetsluis and on 25 August 1689 it participated in the battle of Walcourt. It next wintered in Brugge and/or Gent9. In July 1690 the Coldstream missed the battle of Fleurus. On 3 August 1692 the Coldstream Guards were in the Battle of Steenkerque, were it suffered only 2 wounded and 3 missing10. In September 1692 the Coldstream regiment was in West Flanders.

In June 1693 the Coldstream Guards camped near the Abbey of Parck10b. On 26 July 1693 it was in the battle of Landen (Neerwinden), at the time William Seymour was Lieutenant-Colonel. On 12 June 1694 Tollemache11 died of wounds he had received in the Camaret Bay expedition. On 14 October 1694 the appointment of John Cutts as colonel of the Coldstream Guards was announced. In 1695 the regiment participated in the siege of Namur. The second foot guards or Coldstreamers were on the 5 March 1699 bill that listed the 7,000 troops that were to remain on the English establishment. They were then designed to count 694 men in one battalion under John Cutts.

The Coldstream Guards in the War of the Spanish Succession

John Cutts never went to Spain, but the Coldstream guards contributed a lot of companies to a Guards battalion that first fought in Spain and then on the continent (see the first Guards paragraphs). In January 1707 John Cutts died. He was succeeded by Charles Churchill, who became colonel of the Coldstream Guards in 1707. On 11 October 1714 William Earl of Cadogan became colonel.

Notes

1) English Army Lists and Commission Registers, 1661-1714, Vol. IV London 1898, page 3 has 26 August 1650 as date of George Monk's appointment (not present in the commission entry books)
2) English Army Lists and Commission Registers, has 6 January 1670 as date of the Earl of Craven's appointment (present in the commission entry books)
3) English Army Lists and Commission Registers, has 1 May 1689 as date of the Tollemache's appointment (not present in the commission entry books)
4) English Army Lists and Commission Registers, has 3 October 1694 as date of the Cutts's appointment (present in the commission entry books)
5) For the Coldstream regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Origin and services of the Coldstream Guards by Colonel Mac Kinnon. London 1833. It can be consulted online: Origin and services of the Coldstream Guards
6) Sir Thomas Monck's 1608-1670 sons: the eldest was also called Thomas (died about 1649 leaving two daughters), George Monck (1608-1670) was the second son. By 1650 he had already made a long career in the army.
7) Origin and services of the Coldstream Guards volume 1 page 100
8) Origin and services of the Coldstream Guards by Colonel Mac Kinnon. London 1833 page 201 has a small biography of William earl of Craven first baron and Earl Craven (June 1608 - 1697). In early 1689 he was 80 years old.
9) Wilhelm III von Oranien und Georg Friedrich von Waldeck by P.L. Müller, The Hague 1873 v. 2 page 227 has the appendix D: Die Niederländische Armee unter Waldecks Oberbefehl im Winter 1689-90, has the 2nd battalion garde (Oberst Talmash) as wintering in Brugge and Gent.
10) Wilhelm III von Oranien und Georg Friedrich von Waldeck by P.L. Müller, The Hague 1873 v. 2 page 238 has the appendix G: Verluste der Alliierten bei Steenkerken. 3 Aug. 1692, it has the Coldstream Guards with its losses.
10b) Europische Mercurius for June 1693 page 289 has the Lyste van het leger der Geallieerden, gecampeerd by d'Abdye van Park, onder den Koning van Engeland en den Keurvorst van Beyeren., it has 2 battalions of English Guards in the first and 1 in the second line.
11) Memoires et Observations faites par un voyageur en Angleterre The Hague 1698, page 182: Le Général Talmash meurt á Plimouth des blessures qu'il avoit reçűës á l'entreprise de Brest, & est fort regreté. 12 Juin 1694.