Granville's regiment of foot, a.k.a. as 10th Foot

The Earl of Bath's regiment of foot

Commanded by:
John Granville Earl of Bath120 June 1685 - 8 December 1688
Charles Carney28 December 1688 - 31 December 1688
John Granville Earl of Bath331 December 1688 - 29 October 1693
Sir Beville Granville429 October 1693 - 15 January 1703
William Lord North and Grey15 January 1703 - 1715
Henry Grove23 June 1715

This regiment5 was again one of those raised at the time of Monmouth's invasion. On 20 June 1685 John Granville Earl of Bath (1628-1701) got a commission to raise 11 companies of foot, to unite them with the Plymouth independent garrison company and thus form a new regiment. In November 1688 the regiment was in garrison at Plymouth together with the regiment which would later become the 13th foot. The Earl of Bath switched to William III and arrested the commander of the other regiment. James II reacted by officially relieving the Earl of Bath of his command on 8 December and appointing Charles Carney, but this was just as officially reversed by William III on 31 December 1688.

In 1689 and 1690 the regiment stayed in garrison in the citadel of Plymouth and on the Channel Islands. In 1691 the regiment then sailed to Ostend under the command of Beville Granville (nephew to the Earl of Bath). Here Granville's regiment went into winter quarters. It took the field again in May 1692 and was encamped near Halle in early August. It then fought in the battle of Steenkerque on 3 August 1692, where it suffered 44 killed and 5 wounded6. After that it went to Damme in October and wintered there. In June 1693 it was on the Parck camp list of troops in William's army. On 1 July the regiment was detached from the main force in order to attack some enemy lines between the Schelde and the Lys and so it missed the battle of Landen (Neerwinden).

Sir Beville Granville's regiment of foot

On 29 October 1693 Beville Granville was officially appointed as colonel of the regiment and that same month it went into winter quarters in Brugge. In 1694 the regiment took the field again as part of Brigadier General Stewart's brigade and this is indeed the time we see the regiment appear as Grenville on an Order of Battle. It ended this year in winter quarters in Malines. In 1695 the regiment was at first in some diversionary actions7 and during these it lost its commanding officer who was Lieutenant-Colonel Sydney Godolphin. After the siege of Namur it went into winter quarters on the Flemish Coast.

Due to civil unrest the regiment returned home in March 1696. In May 1697 the regiment was again ordered to the Spanish Netherlands, but did not do much. In order to evade the disbanding act the regiment went to Ireland in July 1698 and stayed on that establishment for three years. In June 1701 it then embarked at Cork and sailed for the United Provinces. In 1702 it was part of the camp near Roosendaal from where it went to Kranenburg. It was then part of the Nijmegen affair and was in the camp of Dukenburg on 7 July 17028. After the rivers were crossed it stayed with the main force during the sieges of the Meuse fortresses. The Granville regiment then participated in the siege of the citadel of Liège. It closed the campaign wintering in Breda.

William Lord North and Grey's regiment of foot

Because Beville Granville became governor of Barbados the regiment went to William Lord North and Grey, who was appointed on 15 January 1703. In May 1703 it participated in the confrontation near Loonaken. It then participated in the siege of Huy in August. In May 1704 the North and Grey regiment marched to the Danube. Here it participated in the battle of the Schellenberg. At Blenheim it was part of the force attacking the village of Blindheim. In this battle Lord North and Grey lost his right hand. After that the regiment marched to Holland escorting the prisoners.

In 1705 the regiment marched to the Moselle. The North and Grey regiment was then in the crossing of the Brabant Lines. In 1706 it was present at the battle of Ramillies. In July it covered the siege of Oostende and afterwards it took part in the siege of Menin. It wintered in Gent.

In March 1708 the regiment embarked for England to prevent the French attempt on Scotland, but at the end of April it was already back in Gent. Later that year it participated in the battle of Oudenaarde and was part of the force covering the siege of Lille. The North and Grey regiment closed the campaign with the siege of Gent were Lieutenant-Colonel Grove was captured.

In 1709 the North and Grey regiment first covered the siege of Tournay and then participated in the siege of its citadel. It then took part in the battle of Malplaquet and covering the siege of Mons. In 1710 it was part of the siege of Douay and the siege of Aire. It then went into winter quarters in Kortrijk. In 1711 the North and Grey regiment took part in the siege of Bouchain. In 1712 the regiment was part of the force covering the siege of Quesnoy. With that the war was finished for the regiment, but it stayed in quarters in Gent, and in April 1714 it was in Nieuport. In 1715 Lieutenant-General North and Grey was removed and replaced by Brigadier-General Henry Grove, who was appointed on 23 June 1715.

Notes

1) English Army Lists and Commission Registers, 1661-1714, Vol. IV London 1898, page 6 has 20 June 1685 as date of the Earl of Bath's appointment (present in the commission entry books)
2) English Army Lists Vol. IV London 1898, page 6 has 8 December 1688 as date of Charles Carney's appointment (not present in the commission entry books)
3) English Army Lists Vol. IV London 1898, page 6 has 31 December 1688 as date of the Earl of Bath's re-appointment (as present in the commission entry books)
4) English Army Lists Vol. IV London 1898, page 6 has 29 October 1693 as date of Sir Bevil Granville's appointment (present in the commission entry books)
5) For Granville's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1847, The Tenthe, or North Lincolnshire Regiment of Foot.
6) Wilhelm III von Oranien und Georg Friedrich von Waldeck by P.L. Müller, The Hague 1873 v. 2 page 238 has the appendix G: Verluste der Alliierten bei Steenkerken. 3 Aug. 1692, it has Bath's ('Beath') regiment with its losses.
7) Plan du Camp que l'Armée de sa Majesté Britanique etc. etc. prit le 30 Juin (1695) á Wontergem (and Aarsle) has the Granville regiment.
8) Ordre de Bataille du 7me Juillet au camp de Duckenburg has the Granville regiment.