Descriptions of the English infantry regiments on 1 January 1703

The English Infantry order of battle on 1 January 1703.

Names are those of the colonels commanding on 1 January 1703. The order follows the 1751 ranking. The first 15 regiments are on separate pages.

James Earl of Barrymore; 13th Foot

This was also a regiment which was raised on the account of Monmouth's invasion. Its first colonel was Theophilus Hastings 7th Earl of Huntingdon, appointed in June 1685. In 1688 Colonel Huntingdon lay in garrison in Plymouth with his cousin (and Lt-Colonel) Ferdinando Hastings and the regiment of the Earl of Bath. Ferdinando then joined the Earl of Bath in arresting his uncle and switching to the Prince of Orange. Ferdinando Hastings was rewarded with the colonelcy of the regiment. After William III came to power the Hastings' regiment marched to Scotland under Hugh Mackay. The rest of the army consisted of the later 21st, 25th and 26th and four 'Dutch battalions'. On 27 July 1689 the battle of Killiecrankie was fought against a Jacobite Highlander force led by Viscount Dundee and Hastings regiment was on the losing side18. In 1690 the regiment fought on the Boyne. Hastings' regiment missed Aughrim in 1991, because it was in County Cork. In March 1695 Colonel Hastings was succeeded by Sir John Jacob18b.

The Jacob regiment was one of the regiments which survived the disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. Sir John Jacob was succeeded by James Earl of Barrymore on 15 March 170218c. On 7 July Barrimore's regiment was in camp at Dukenburg (near Nijmegen).

John Tidcomb; 14th Foot

During19 the events of 1685 Sir Edward Hales Baronet of Woodchurch raised a company of 100 men near Canterbury. Other men also raised companies and on 22 June 1685 Edward Hales got a commission as its colonel. Of course it missed the battle of Sedgemoor, but it was in time for the August 1685 parade on Hounslow Heath. In September 1688 it marched to Salisbury. Meanwhile its Roman Catholic Colonel Edward Hales was not eligible for his commission because of his religion, but in this James II intervened. Edward Hales chose not to switch sides and ended up in the Tower. On 31 December 1688 the regiment was transferred to William Beveridge, an officer who had served in the Anglo-Dutch brigade. In 1689 the regiment marched to Scotland and participated in pacifying Scotland. In spring 1692 the Beveridge regiment embarked for Flanders, but was quickly ordered to return. After the alarm caused by the French naval threat had subsided the regiment went to Flanders again, where it lay in the Furnes and Dixmuiden. On 14 November 1692 Colonel William Beveridge was killed in a duel. He was succeeded by John Tidcomb, who had been Lieutenant-colonel in Colonel Hastings regiment. Tidcomb's regiment wintered in Flanders and participated in the battle of Landen (Neerwinden) on 29 July 1693. It suffered serious losses and afterwards wintered in Brugge. In 1694 it did nothing significant except for covering the siege of Huy. Tidcomb's regiment again wintered in Brugge. In 1695 Tidcomb's regiment took part in the attack on Fortress de Knokke. Afterwards it joined the covering army for the siege of Namur and finally the siege itself. It wintered near the Gent-Brugge canal. In March 1696 the regiment arrived back in Gravesend in order to secure the English crown and was assigned to duty at the Tower of London in November.

In March 1698 the Tidcomb regiment had arrived in Belfast and Cork in order to evade the disbanding act and so it continued on the Irish establishment for a few years. At the outbreak of the War of the Spanish Succession it then stayed on this establishment. From March to November 1706 it garrisoned Dublin and meanwhile it often sent detachments to other regiments. On 14 June 1713 Lieutenant general Tidcomb died at Bath. He was replaced by Jasper Clayton up till then Colonel of a recently disbanded regiment. In 1715 the regiment was sent to Scotland, where it landed at Saltcoats in Ayrshire early in the summer.

Emanuel Howe; 15th Foot

Howe's regiment was the last one raised in 1685. Then Sir William Clifton was appointed by commission of 22 June 1685. He retired in May 1686 and was succeeded by Arthur Herbert, afterwards Earl or Torrington. Rear-Admiral Arthur Herbert was then Master of the Robes and one of the favorites of James II, who asked his cooperation in repealing the test acts. This Herbert refused to do and he was thus disgraced in March 1687, loosing all his appointments. His regiment was then rumored to be transferred to Major General Donough Maccarty20, but it seems that this appointment did not come through. In April 1687 Sackville Tufton20b was appointed as colonel20c of Herbert's regiment. In the 1688 events Tufton was at Canterbury with his regiment and he later stated that he would gladly have fought against the Prince of Orange. Anyway, on 19 December 1688 the Tufton's regiment was ordered to Berwick. Sackville Tufton refused to pledge to the new government and was therefore succeeded by Sir James Leslie. Under James Leslie the regiment marched to Inverness. It then marched to reconstruct Fort William and was thereafter in the battle of 30 April 1690. From the Highlands the regiment was then moved to Flanders. James Leslie was succeeded by Emanuel Scrope Howe20c in November 1695.

The Howe regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by hiding on the Irish establishment. In 1704 the regiment participated in the battle of Blenheim. In 1709 the regiment participated in the siege of the citadel of Tournay20d. After Emanuel Scrope Howe died on 26 September 1709 his regiment went to Algernon Seymour, Duke of Somerset on 23 October 170920e.

James Stanley Earl of Derby; 16th Foot

On the eve of the invasion by the Prince of Orange seven new infantry regiments were raised. This regiment later known as James Stanley21 had been raised in the southern counties of England. Its first colonel was the former Lt-Colonel of the Royal Regiment, Archibald Douglas appointed on 9 October 168821a. Robert Hodges was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel. When William III came to power he ordered the regiment to Buckinghamshire. With Archibald Douglas staying loyal to James II Robert Hodges was appointed as colonel on 13 December 1688. In early 1689 Hodges' regiment was ordered to the United Provinces. Here it participated in the battle of Walcourt and lost its Lieutenant-Colonel Graham. In 1690 it missed the battle of Fleurus. In 1691 the regiment was part of the army that failed to secure Mons. On 3 August 1692 the regiment participated in the battle of Steenkerkque and lost Colonel Hodges. He was succeeded by James Stanley afterwards Earl of Derby, who had been Lieutenant -colonel of the First Foot guards. On 29 Jul the Stanley regiment participated in the battle of Landen (Neerwinden) and it then wintered at Dendermonde. In 1694 Stanley's regiment was also in Flanders and it again wintered in Dendermonde. In 1695 Stanley's regiment was in the trenches before Namur and later in the covering army. In the 1696 and 1697 the regiment also served in Flanders.

After the peace of Rijswijk in 1697 the Stanley regiment was shipped to Ireland and it survived the 1699 disbandings on that establishment. On 7 June 1701 the regiment embarked at Carrickfergus and after shifting to Dutch vessels it arrived in Heusden. In March 1702 the regiment went to Roosendaal. This was followed by a march to Cleves and participation in the Nijmegen encounter. The Stanley regiment then joined the main force and covered the sieges of Venlo, Roermond and Stevensweert. At the end of the year it participated in the capture of Liège where its grenadier company participated in the assault on the citadel. In 1703 the Stanley regiment again campaigned in Flanders. In 1704 the Stanley regiment participated in the march to the Danube. It participated in the Battle of the Schellenberg Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton was wounded. Later on it participated in the battle of Blenheim and was part of the army covering the third siege of Landau. In 1705 the regiment was part of the force that was stopped at Syrk. In May 1705 Stanley retired from the service and he was succeeded by Francis Godfrey, a former lt-colonel of the Foot Guards. The Godfrey regiment was present when the army crossed the lines of Brabant. In 1706 the Godfrey regiment participated in the battle of Ramillies and it wintered in Gent. In 1707 the regiment continues in Flanders, but nothing much happened. In 1708 it was part of the forces returning to England on account of the attempt on Scotland, but quickly returned to Flanders. In July 1708 the Godfrey regiment participated in the battle of Oudenaarde. After that the regiment participated in the Siege of Lille. In 1709 the regiment was employed in covering the siege of Tournay and in besieging the citadel. In September it participated in the battle of Malplaquet and thereafter in covering the siege of Mons. In 1710 the regiment covered the sieges of Douay and Bethune. In 1711 Godfrey retired from the service and was succeeded by Brigadier General Henry Durell, by appointment of 17 February 1711. That year it participated in the siege of Bouchain. In 1712 it took the field again and on 1 December of that year Brigadier-General Durell died. It was probably on account of the armistice that his successor Hans Hamilton was only appointed on 23 June 1713. This Hamilton regiment then stayed in Dunkirk till April 1714 and then sailed to Scotland. In 1715 Richard Viscount Irving succeeded as colonel.

Matthew Bridges; 17th Foot

This Bridges regiment22 had also been raised on the eve of the Prince of Orange's invasion. By commission of 27 September 1688 Solomon Richards became its first colonel. After the revolution the regiment was ordered to Ireland. On 3 April 1689 the regiment embarked at Liverpool together with Cunningham's Foot and after some contrary winds it arrived in the vicinity of Londonderry on 15 April. A Council of War was then held and it was decided that the regiments should return to England because there were too few provisions and too little chance of success. This was done and after their return William III dismissed Cunningham and Richards, replacing the latter with Sir George St. George by commission of 1 May 1689. The regiment was subsequently deployed in England till it was ordered to Flanders in 1693. Till spring 1694 it lay in garrison in Oostende and then participated in the marches of the campaign. On 1 May 1695 Sir George St. George exchanged regiments with James Courthorpe. In May 1695 the regiment was in the operation in West Flanders and the covering army under the Prince of Vaudemont. On 11 August it then arrived to participate in the siege of the citadel of Namur. On 30 August it participated in a very bloody assault on Terra Nova in which Colonel Courthorpe was killed and Lieutenant-Colonel Matthew Bridges was severely wounded. Sir Matthew Bridges then became colonel of the regiment and the regiment wintered in Brugge. In 1696 the Bridges regiment was again under the Prince de Vaudemont, but nothing particular happened. In 1697 it was part of the main force and after the peace it retired to England and later Ireland.

The Bridges regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. On 15 June 1701 it embarked at Cork and sailed for Holland where it came in garrison at Gorkum. On 10 March 1702 the Bridges regiment marched to Roosendaal and later on to the Duchy of Cleves. In June it became mixed up in the Nijmegen affair. After that it participated in the siege of Venlo and in September it participated in the siege of Roermond. In 1703 the regiment was in the action of Loonaken and engaged in covering the sieges of Huy and Limbourg. Meanwhile its Lieutenant-Colonel Holcroft Blood had succeeded as colonel on 26 August 1703. In October the regiment sailed from Holland to Portsmouth and on 15 March 1704 it landed in Portugal. Its Colonel Blood continued to serve as brigadier-general and artillery commander on the continent and died in Brussel on 20 August 1707 without ever going to Spain. In Portugal the regiment was probably under the effective command of Lieutenant-Colonel James Wightman, who was its Lieutenant-Colonel since 1702 and got the rank of colonel in August 170322b. In 1704 the regiment participated in the campaign against Berwick. In 1705 the Blood regiment was engaged in the siege of Valencia de Alcantara, which was taken on 8 May, and the siege of Albuquerque. After summer quarters the regiment participated in the failed siege of Badajoz. In March 1706 the regiment was employed in the siege of Alcantara, which fell on 14 April and in the siege of Ciudad Rodrigo, which fell on 26 May. In late June 1706 the regiment entered Madrid and later retreated to Valencia. In April 1707 the regiment fought at Almansa. After this defeat the remnants of the regiment under Brigadier-General Joseph Wightman were employed in the defense of Catalonia and numbered 226 men. In August 1707 Wightman also became the official colonel ('owner') of the regiment. In 1708 the regiment still participated in the defense of Catalonia, but at the end of that campaign it transferred its serviceable men to other regiments and arrived in England early in 1709. In 1710 the regiment was in Scotland and it remained there till the peace, when it was transferred to Ireland.

Frederick Hamilton Viscount Boyne; 18th Foot

A.k.a. Royal Irish regiment

The Frederick Hamilton regiment23 had its roots in the Irish Army. At the time of the restoration Charles II founded the Royal Regiment of Ireland, a regiment consisting of about 20 independent troops of Horse and 8 companies of Foot. At the close of his reign the cavalry units were transformed into three cavalry regiments and the Foot were made into 7 infantry regiments. By commission of 1 April 1684 Arthur Earl of Granard was made colonel of one of these. In 1685 it came to England on account of the Monmouth rebellion, but it returned to Ireland later on. When James II started to replace Protestant officers in the Irish army the Earl of Granard resigned in favor of his son Arthur Lord Forbes who was commissioned on 1 March 1686. In 1687 the Earl of Tyrconel then inspected the Irish army and dismissed most of the Protestant officers and soldiers, but this regiment was one of the least effected. In 1688 the regiment was ordered to England where it joined the army at Salisbury. Later it marched to Colnbrook. After the revolution it dismissed about 500 officers and soldiers and only about 200 Protestant men remained. They were later joined by the Protestant officers of Hamilton's Irish regiment, which was disbanded. Lord Forbes retired from the service and was succeeded by its Major Sir John Edgeworth by commission of 31 December 1688. Edgeworth was then dismissed for irregularities and replaced by commission of 1 May 1689 with Edward Brabazon Earl of Meath. Meanwhile Major Newcombe was made Lieutenant-Colonel and Captain Frederick Hamilton became major of the regiment. The regiment landed near Belfast on 22 August 1689 and proceeded to Dundalk. On 1 July 1690 the Earl of Meath's regiment participated in the battle of the Boyne. It then participated in the failed 1690 siege of Limerick. Here it lost Lieutenant-Colonel Newcombe who was replaced by Major Frederick Hamilton. In 1691 the Earl of Meath regiment participated in the siege of Ballymore and the assault on Athlone. Later it participated in the battle of Aughrim and the sieges of Galway and Limerick. At the capitulation of Limerick the Royal Regiment of Ireland, which had remained loyal to James II evacuated to France. In 1692 the Earl of Meath regiment crossed into England. Later that year it crossed to Oostende, fortified Furnes and Dixmuiden and returned to England again. The Earl of Meath retired (died in 1708) and was succeeded by Frederick Hamilton (appointed 19 December 1692), with Major Ormsby becoming Lieutenant-Colonel. In 1693 the regiment was on board the fleet and it ended that campaign by disembarking at Oostende. In 1694 the regiment campaigned in Flanders and its rank towards other regiments was regulated. This was done by a board of general offficers assembled in the Netherlands on 10 June. It ordained that English regiments raised in England should rank according to their date of formation and other regiments (Scots, Irish, Anglo-Dutch) should rank according to the date they were first place on the English establishment. This way the Frederick Hamilton regiment lost rank to 11 regiments which had been raised by James II. In 1695 the regiment was part of the covering army under De Vaudemont. After the city of Namur had surrendered the regiment took part in the assault on the citadel. It lost Lieutenant-Colonel Ormsby, but so distinguished itself in this attack that it got the designation Royal Regiment of Foot of Ireland later changed to Royal Irish Regiment. In 1695 and 1697 the regiment did not do much and on 10 December 1697 it embarked at Oostende and went to Ireland.

The Frederick Hamilton regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. On 20 March 1701 the Frederick Hamilton regiment was in Charles Fort, Kinsale23b. In 1701 the regiment sailed to Holland where it came in garrison in Heusden. In March 1702 the Frederick Hamilton regiment marched to Roosendaal and from there to the Duchy of Cleves. It June became entangled in the action at Nijmegen. It then participated in the sieges of Venlo and Roermond. It closed the campaign with its presence at the siege of Liège and retired to winter quarters in Heusden. In 1703 it covered the sieges of Huy and Limbourg and wintered in Breda. In 1704 the Frederick Hamilton regiment marched to the Danube. Here it participated in the Battle of the Schellenberg and the siege of Rain. Later it was in the Battle of Blenheim and it covered the siege of Landau. When the latter was almost finished the regiment embarked at Germersheim and arrived in Nijmegen 12 days later. It then marched to Roermond where it wintered. Frederick Hamilton then retired and sold his commission to Richard Ingoldsby. Up till then Ingoldsby had been colonel of the 23rd. He was commissioned on 1 April 1705. Later that year Ingoldsby's regiment was present at the forcing of the Brabant Lines. In 1706 the regiment fought at Ramillies and participated in the siege of Menin. After wintering in Gent Ingoldsby's participated in an uneventful campaign. It wintered in the Citadel of Gent and its commanding officer Lieutenant-Colonel Stearne was appointed governor. In 1708 the regiment was briefly ordered to England and fought in the battle of Oudenaarde under Lieutenant-Colonel Stearne. After that the regiment was employed in the siege of Lille. In 1709 the regiment participated in the siege of Tournay. It arrived somewhat later at the Battle of Malplaquet and here it engaged the Royal Regiment of Foot which had transferred to French service. After covering the Siege of Mons the regiment wintered in Gent. In 1710 the regiment covered the sieges of Douay and Bethune. Later it participated in the siege of Aire, it again wintered in Gent. In 1711 the regiment participated in the Siege of Bouchain and wintered in Lille. Lieutenant-General Ingoldsby died in February 1712 and was succeeded by Lieutenant-Colonel Stearne on 18 February 1712. The campaign of 1712 was ended with winter quarters in Gent. In 1713 its famous Captain Parker was sent to England to claim rank as fifth regiment, but this failed again. In the winter of 1713 the regiment suffered a mutiny which ended in 10 men getting executed.

Thomas Erle; 19th Foot

The Thomas Erle regiment24 was the first that had been founded by William III. Its first commander was Colonel Francis Luttrell of Dunster Castle. The first mention that we have of him is that he marched with the militia of Somersetshire against Monmouth in 1685 and was forced back from Thaunton. He is then again mentioned on 17 November 1688, stating that he and others of Somersetshire had gone over to the Prince of Orange. On 19 November 1688 we then have that Luttrells regiment secured Exeter after that prince left it. It therefore seems that a regular regiment was made out of Luttrel's militia. While the regiment was quartered in the citadel of Plymouth, Francis Luttrell died there on 25 July 169024b. Colonel Thomas Erle succeeded Francis Luttrell in January 169124c. The regiment then participated in the Battle of Aughrim on 12 July 1691, where colonel Erle was wounded. In July 1692 the regiment was with the main force in Flanders and participated in the battle of Steenkerque. In 1695 the regiment was in West Flanders under De Vaudemont, who covered the siege of Namur.

The Thomas Erle regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. In 1702 the 'Earl' regiment was part of the expedition to Cadiz, where it was in the second line of the 15 August landings. After the failure of the operation against Cadiz Erle's regiment was sent to the West-Indies24d. It seems that after returning from there the regiment then stayed in Ireland for a while, for have not yet found many battle honors for this regiment during the War of the Spanish Succession. Its colonel Thomas Erle did go to Spain and commanded part of the army at Almansa, but his regiment was somewhere else. On 30 August 1708 Marlborough ordered it to stay in Brussel under colonel Frecke. He may have been a Colonel-Commandant at the time, because the regiment is explicitly named Lieutenant-General Erle's.

Gustavus Hamilton; 20th Foot

The Gustavus Hamilton regiment was one of the first three that had been raised by William III25. Its first commander was Sir Robert Peyton, who had served in the Anglo-Dutch brigade. Sir Robert Peyton died in early May 1689. Gustavus Hamilton25b (later Viscount Boyne) succeeded to the regiment. Under his command the regiment fought at the Boyne on 1 July 1690. In 1691 it fought at Aughrim.

The Gustavus Hamilton regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. In 1702 it was part of the expedition to Cadiz25c. After this expedition had failed the regiment continued to the West Indies. It's then very difficult to find out what happened exactly later on.

Archibald Row; 21st Foot

In 1678 a regiment of foot26 was formed in Scotland of which Charles Earl of Mar was appointed as colonel on 23 September 1678. The regiment saw its first action in the Battle of Bothwell Bridge on 22 June 1679. In 1685 it was engaged in suppressing the rebellion of the Earl of Argyle. In 1686 Thomas Buchan became colonel of the regiment. In 1688 the regiment marched to England against the Prince of Orange. After the change of power the regiment was ordered to Oxfordshire. Thomas Buchan was dismissed and succeeded by Francis Fergus O'Farrell by commission of 1 March 1689. The O'Farrell then sailed to Holland. It then took part in the battle of Walcourt. The regiment wintered in Flanders, but in 1690 it was too late for the battle of Fleurus. In 1691 and 1692 it was also in Flanders and took part in the battle of Steenkerque where it suffered heavy losses. In 1693 it took part in the battle of Landen (Neerwinden) and it again suffered heavy losses. In 1694 the regiment was given rank in the British army according to the date it entered on the English establishment. In 1695 the regiment garrisoned Deinse when Villeroy detached a regiment against it. O'Farrell surrendered with his regiment without firing a shot and was afterwards tried and dismissed. He was succeeded by Robert Mackay, who died in December 1696. By commission of 1 January 1697 he was succeeded by Archibald Row, formerly Lieutenant-Colonel of Stanley's regiment. After the peace of Rijswijk the regiment was shipped to Scotland.

Archibald Row's regiment survived the 1699 disbandings on the Scottish establishment. In1702 it went to Holland and stayed at Breda for some time. In April 1703 the Row's regiment joined the main force and participated in the siege of Limbourg. In 1704 Row's regiment marched to the Danube. There it took part in the Battle of the Schellenberg, and the battle of Blenheim. At the latter Colonel Archibald Row and Major Campbell were mortally wounded and Lieutenant-colonel Dalyel was killed. The regiment was then employed in escorting prisoners to Holland and John Viscount Mordaunt was made colonel. In 1705 the regiment was on the Moselle and at the Battle of the Brabant Lines. In June 1706 Mordaunt exchanged regiments with Sampson de la Loo. This was after the regiment had participated in the battle of Ramillies, but because the prints of the Order of Battle reflect both the La Loo regiment and Mordaunt's regiment we can still conclude with certainty that the regiment was present there. Afterwards La Loo's regiment (Or Lalo's) covered the subsequent sieges. In 1707 the regiment got the title North British Fusileers. In 1708 La Loo's regiment was in the battle of Oudenaarde and it participated in the Siege of Lille. In 1709 the regiment was employed in covering the siege of Tournay. In the Battle of Malplaquet Colonel de Lalo and three captains were killed. On 4 September 1709 Viscount Mordaunt was therefore reappointed. In 1710 Mordaunt's regiment participated in the siege of Douay and was employed in covering the sieges of Bethune, St. Venant and Aire. That year Mordaunt died and was succeeded by Major-General Meredith. In turn Meredith was succeeded by the Earl of Orrery in December26b26c. In 1711 the regiment participated in the Siege of Arleux. This was the last of its engagements and after the accession of George I the regiment was ordered to England where it landed at Gravesend on 23 August 1714. In 1715 the regiment fought the Jacobite rebels at Sheriff-muir.

Thomas Handasyde; 22nd Foot

After the Glorious Revolution Henry Howard Duke of Norfolk raised a regiment (his second) with a commission of March 168927. That same year he was succeeded by Sir Henry Bellasis. In August 1689 the regiment went to Ireland where it participated in the siege of Carrickfergus. From there it marched to Dundalk and wintered in Armagh. On 1 July 1690 the Bellasis regiment participated in the Battle of the Boyne. After that it marched to Athlone, but found the place to well prepared. It ended the year with the failed siege of Limerick. In 1691 the Bellasis regiment started with the Sieges of Ballymore and Athlone. On 12 July 1691 it fought in the Battle of Aughrim It then captured Galway in July. In 1695 the regiment sailed to Oostende and made an uneventful campaign. In March 1696 it briefly returned to England and after the Peace of Rijswijk it went to Ireland.

The Bellasis regiment survived the 1699 disbandings on the Irish establishment. In 1701 the regiment was destined for Jamaica, and thanks to the correspondence of Henry Hyde we have some details about how they were shipped. On 12 April 1701 Lieutenant-Colonel Handasyde arrived in Kinsale, where the regiment had been stationed. On Sunday he then ordered the regiment to embark. Three companies where embarked on the warship Scarborough and seven on a transport ship. William Selwyn was designated as the governor of the island. Bellasis therefore readily agreed to become colonel of Selwyn's much older regiment by exchanging them. Selwyn's regiment thus sailed to Jamaica. While there Selwyn died and was succeeded by his Lietenant-Colonel Thomas Handasyd by commission of 20 June 1702. The Handasys regiment continued on Jamaica and in 1712 Thomas Handasys retired from the service. He was succeeded by his son and lieutenant-colonel Roger Handasyd. After the Peace of Utrecht the regiment left two independent companies on Jamaica and returned to Europe.

Richard Ingoldsby; 23rd Foot

The first colonel of this regiment was Henry Herbert in 1689. He was succeeded by Charles Herbert that same year. In July 1690 Herbert's regiment was present at the battle of the Boyne. In January 1691 we then have a regiment called Colonel Herberts and in later 1691 we have Colonel Hebert's regiment entering Galway28. Anyway we then have a colonel Herbert who was killed at the Battle of Aughrim, supposedly in cold blood after having been captured28b. At the time Toby Purcell was lieutenant-colonel of the regiment28c, but he was not made colonel. On a 9 November 1691 list28d we have the regiment designated as 'Regiment late col. Herbert's and on a list of 25 November 1692 the regiment is designated as 'Sir John Morgan's late Herbert's'28e. John Morgan died and was succeeded by Richard Ingoldsby28f on 28 February 1693. In 1695 the regiment was in the siege of Namur. In 1697 the Ingoldsby regiment was in Flanders.

The Ingoldsby regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. On 17 May 1701 Ingoldsby's regiment was still in Ireland and was ordered to ready themselves to march. On 7 July Ingoldsby's regiment was at Dukenburg, near Nijmegen. In 1704 the regiment marched to the Danube and was in the battles of the Schellenberg and Blenheim. On 1 April 1705 Ingoldsby was commissioned as colonel of Frederick Hamilton's (18th) regiment. We can therefore assume that his successor Joseph Sabine was appointed at the same date. The Sabine regiment was in the battle of Malplaquet. In August 1711 the Sabine regiment was in the Siege of Bouchain28g.151

Duke of Marlborough; 24th Foot

This was also one of the regiments raised by William III. Sir Edward Dering was the first Colonel of this regiment on 8 March 1689. Under his command the regiment was probably at Dundalk in 1689, because we have a register of his death there on 15 October 168929. Colonel Dering's regiment was in some garrison during the 1 July 1690 battle of the Boyne29b. He was succeeded by colonel Samuel Venner. Colonel Venner's regiment was specified as being in Ulster during the battle of Aughrim. On 11 November 1693 Colonel Venner's regiment was ordered to the Flemish Coast. In early March 1694 Venner regiment was again ordered to Flanders. A Colonel Venner was killed in the Camaret Bay expedition29c. Venner was succeeded by the Louis le Vasseur de Cogné Marquis de Puissar. In May 1697 Puissar's regiment was ordered to Flanders.

The Marquis de Puiissar regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. The Marquis de Puissar was succeeded by William Seymour on 1 March 1701. On 12 February 1702 William Seymour was appointed as colonel of what later became the 4th Foot. He was succeeded by John Churchill Earl (and on 14 December 1702) Duke of Marlborough with William Tatton as Lieutenant-Colonel. Marlborough's regiment was at Dukenburg in July 1702. In 1704 the regiment participated in the march to the Danube and the battles of Schellenberg and Blenheim. In August 1704 Marlborough became colonel of the 1st Foot Guards and that same month he was replaced by Tatton. The Tatton regiment was present when the Brabant Lines were forced in 1705. In 1706 the regiment was in the Battle of Ramilllies. In 1708 Tatton disposed of his regiment and Primrose became colonel.

James Maitland; 25th Foot

A.k.a. The Edinburgh regiment

After William III had assumed the throne in England a convention met in Scotland to decide about the Scottish crown. This convention met on 14 March and one of its decisions was to levy a guard for the city of Edinburgh. As colonel of these 800 men they appointed David Melville30 (later Earl of Leven). In July 1693 Leven's regiment took part in the battle of Landen (Neerwinden). In 1694 James Maitland became colonel of the regiment. Maitland's regiment participated in the siege of Namur. In 1697 it was part of the main force in Flanders.

Maitland's regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Scottish establishment. In 1711 he was succeeded by William Breton

Ferguson; 26th Foot

A.k.a. The Cameronian Regiment

This regiment31 had its roots in a church led by Richard Cameron. Troops of these men served in protecting the 1689 convention that was to deliberate upon the crown of Scotland. In April these Cameronians then proposed to levy a regiment for the convention. On 19 April 1689 the estates of Scotland commissioned James Lord Angus as its colonel and Cleland as lieutenant-colonel. The regiment missed the Battle of Killiecrankie. On 17 August 1689 the regiment was ordered to Dunkeld under Cleland. There the regiment fortified itself in the houses and cathedral. It was attacked by a very large force of highlanders on 21 August. These forced the regiment back to the church and the manor of the Marquis of Atholl. Lieutenant-Colonel Cleland was killed and Major Henderson mortally wounded and the command fell to Captain Monro. The Highlanders were however unable to force the church or the mansion and retreated in the evening. Fullarton became the next lieutenant-colonel. In February 1691 the Angus regiment embarked for Holland. In 1692 it fought at Steenkerque, where the Earl of Angus, Lieutenant-Colonel Fullarton and the major were killed. By commission of 1 August 1692 the command of the regiment then fell to Andrew Monro, former lieutenant-colonel of the Royal Scots. In July 1693 the regiment fought at Landen (Neerwinden). After that Colonel Monro died of sickness and Lieutenant-Colonel James Ferguson became colonel on 25 August 1693. In 1695 the regiment started in West Flanders and was employed in covering the Siege of Namur. In 1696 and 1697 the regiment was also in Flanders, but nothing much happened.

After the 1697 peace of Rijswijk the Ferguson regiment went into the pay of the States General. On occasion of the return of William's Dutch guard to Holland on 25 April 1699 the Ferguson regiment was dismissed from their service and probably returned to the Scottish establishment. On 7 March 1702 the Ferguson regiment embarked for the United Provinces. In 1704 the Cameronians took part in the battles of the Schellenberg and Blenheim and covered the Siege of Landau. In 1705 the regiment first marched to the Moselle and in July it was present in breaking the Brabant Lines. On 13 September 1705 Ferguson suddenly died in 's Hertogenbosch. He was succeeded by John Borthwick by commission of 24 October 1705. On 1 January 1706 Borthwick however exchanged regiments with John Dalrymple (later Earl of Stair). In 1706 the Dalrymple regiment participated in the Battle of Ramillies and screened Dendermonde. Afterwards John Dalrymple went to another regiment and he was succeeded by George Preston on 24 August 1706. In late August the regiment participated in the Siege of Dendermonde and in September and October it was in the Siege of Ath. Preston's regiment was then present in the Battle of Oudenaarde and the siege of Lille. In 1709 Preston's regiment was in the Battle of Malplaquet and was employed in covering the siege of Mons.

Thomas Whetham; 27th Foot

After the accession of William III had led to civil war in Ireland the people of Enniskillen formed a militia. From this militia originated the Inniskilling regiment of which Zachary Tiffin became colonel on 20 June 1689. In July 1690 Tiffin's regiment fought at the Boyne. In 1691 the regiment was in the Battle of Aughrim. In early 1695 the regiment designated as Tiffeny was in West Flanders. In 1697 the 'Tiffeny' regiment was also in Flanders.

The Tiffin regiment survived the 1699 disbandings by being on the Irish establishment. On 1 July 1702 the Tiffin regiment was in the Leeward Islands. On 29 August 1702 Thomas Whetham succeeded Zachary Tiffin as colonel of the regiment32.

Sir John Gibson; 28th Foot

In 1694 John Gibson became colonel of a regiment. On 16 March 1698 it was reported as disbanded with these officers getting half-pay: Colonel Gibson; Lt-col. Thomas Dore; Major Thomas Handiside; captains Medburn Smith; Clifford Brexton; Griffin May; Robert Dalyell; John Foulk; Edward Rigby; Joseph Hargrave; Hugh Boyd; George Watkins and John Francis Petit33. On 10 March 1702 we then have a list of officers in Colonel John Gibson's regiment. These were: John Gibson; Major Webberley; Captains Brexton; Rigby; Dalyel, Henning; Floyer; Edwards; De Millon; Stoughton33b. It thus seems the regiment might indeed have been disbanded, but that the officers were kept together some way. Therefore the regiment was later on capable of claiming its rank.

On 16 June 1702 Gibson's regiment was ordered to garrison Portsmouth, but later on it was ordered to Ireland. This meant also that they came on the Irish establishment and were paid accordingly33c. In February 1704 Gibson sold his regiment to a Lieutenant-Colonel Lalo. In May 1703 Lalo's regiment was present in the battle of Ramillies. In June 1706 Colonel Lalo gave up this regiment in exchange for Mordaunt's regiment and thus John Mordaunt became colonel of this regiment. On 1 October 1709 Windsor seemed to have become colonel of the regiment33d, but there was some doubt whether it was not in fact given to Meredith33e.

Thomas Farrington; 29th Foot

In 1694 Thomas Farrington had a regiment of Foot34. This regiment was later disbanded, but reconstituted in 1702. In September 1702 the Farington regiment was ordered to Ireland and to be placed on that establishment. In 1705 Farrington's regiment was present at the breaking of the Brabant Lines. In 1706 the 'Farington' regiment fought at Ramillies. Thomas Farrington died on 7 October 1712 and was succeeded by Lord Mark Kerr.

Thomas Saunderson; 30th Foot

The Thomas Saunderson regiment was again a regiment which had been disbanded for some time. It had been founded by James Saunderson, Earl of Castleton in 1689. He had been succeeded by Colonel Thomas Saunderson in 169435. This regiment was then disbanded after the peace of Rijswijk. In 1702 the Thomas Saunderson was however reconstituted as a Marine Regiment by commission of 10 March 170235b. On 15 December 1704 Saunderson was succeeded by Thomas Pownall. In turn Pownall was succeeded by Charles Wills on 13 October 1705.

George Villiers; 31st Foot, Marines

This was a regiment that was William Northcote's in 1694. Another tradition says that in 1694 Sir Richard Atkins36 became colonel of a regiment raised by William III. He died on 28 November 1696 and was succeeded by George Villiers in December36b. Apart from these two entrances I have not yet found anything to link George Villiers regiment of Marines raised in 1702 with these persons. What we do have is a Colonel Northcott's regiment on lists of 1694 list, 1695 and 1696, and then a specific mention of it as being disbanded in March 169936c. It's then made up of these officers: William Northcot; lt-col. Alexander Luttrell, Major Thomas Carew; William Courtney; Christpher Leigh; Jonathan Stukly; Philip Docton; Thomas Adams; Walter Piggott; Christoper Dalton; George Blakeney; Benjamin Buller and Francis Blynman. We can then compare these to a list of commissions made on 10 March 1702 for George Villiers regiment36d: Colonel George Villiers (new); lt-col Luttrell (match); Major Carew (match); Captains: Hedges; Blakeney (match); Buller (match); Docton (match); Blinman (match); Tynte; Adams (match); Piggott (match).

William Northcote's regiment was thus resurrected in February 1702 as a Marine regiment under Colonel George Villiers. In 1703 Colonel George Villiers drowned in the river Piave near Venice. He was succeeded by his lieutenant-colonel Alexander Luttrell on 6 December 1703. On 1 February 1706 Josiah Churchill became colonel36e. He was succeeded by Harry Goring on 1 March 1711.

Edward Fox; 32nd Foot, Marines

This regiment claimed to be descended from that of Fitzpatrick, who had been succeeded by Colonel Francis Collingwood in 1692. A Collingwood regiment then indeed steadily appears in the army lists for 1693-1696. In December 1698 we then have a Colonel Collingwood's regiment in the Leeward Islands. In October 1698 Collingwoods regiment was ordered to the West Indies. In 1699 we then have a mention that Colonel Collingwood and many officers had died there37. In August 1699 Lieutenant-Colonel Fox was appointed as Colonel of this regiment.

In February 1702 Fox was appointed as colonel of a new regiment of marines, but it's rather difficult to determine if this had anything to do with his? regiment in the Leeward islands. In June 1702 the regiment of Colonel Fox was on the Isle of Whight, where it was reviewed by Prince George37b. The regiment then went to Spain where it was in the second line of the 15 August 1702 landings. Colonel Fox was killed in Spain in late 1704. On 5 December 1704 Edward Fox was succeeded by Jacob Borr, who had up till then lieutenant-colonel of this regiment37c.

Earl of Huntingdon; 33rd Foot

In February 1702 William III commissioned the Earl of Huntingdon to raise a regiment38. On 10 March the officers for the Earl of Huntingdon were appointed. The chief officers were: Colonel the Earl of Huntingdon; Lt-Colonel Duncanson; Major Rose; Captains Delivron; Harnage; Erle; Blount; Honywood; Killegrew; La Tour; Vanbrook and D'Harcourt38b. On 8 June 1702 the Earl of Huntingdon's regiment was ordered to Holland, but we do not see it appear on the frontline at Dukenburg. In February 1703 the Earl of Huntingdon laid down the command of the regiment. On 2 March 1703 the appointment of Henry Leigh as colonel of this regiment became known38c. Early in 1705 Lt-Col. Robert Duncanson was appointed as colonel of the regiment, which was in Spain. Here it participated in the siege of Valencia de Alcantara which was started on 2 May 1705. On 8 may 100 men of the regiment formed part of the assault party which succeeded in entering the town. Colonel Duncanson was wounded in this affair38d and afterwards died of his wounds38e. Anyhow, he was succeeded by George Wade. In 1706 the regiment participated in the siege of Alcantara where its colonel was wounded. The Wade regiment then continued in Spain where it was present at Almansa and continued till 1710.

Robert Lucas; 34th Foot

Baron Robert Lucas, governor of the Tower was appointed as the first colonel of this regiment on 12 February 170239. Early in 1702 the regiment was employed in garrison duty. In December 1702 Lord Lucas regiment was ordered to the West Indies, but in the end it only transferred men to Colonel Columbine's regiment. After recruiting the regiment was in Hull and Berwick, and in 1704 it was in Carlisle. On 31 January 1705 Lord Lucas died. He was succeeded by Hans Hamilton, who had been lieutenant-Colonel in Derby's regiment. In May 1705 the regiment embarked on a fleet for Spain. It first sailed to Lisbon and from there to Gibraltar and finally Barcelona. Here the grenadier company participated in storming Montjuich, and the rest of the regiment participated in the siege. After that the regiment garrisoned Tortosa. In 1706 it was part of the forces which defended Barcelona. In early 1707 its serviceable soldiers were transferred to other regiments and the officers were still to embark when the battle of Almansa was fought. In spring 1708 the Hans Hamilton regiment was in southern England. In July 1708 the Hans Hamilton regiment was on the Isle of Wight. In the advanced staged of the Siege of Lille the Hans Hamilton regiment landed at Oostende and garrisoned Leffinghe. Later that year it sailed from Oostende to Antwerpen. In 1709 the regiment was employed in garrisons. In 1710 the regiment participated in the Siege of Douay. Later that year it was employed in covering the sieges of Bethune, Aire and St. Venant. In 1711 the regiment participated in the Siege of Bouchain. In 1712 the regiment marched into Dunkirk, which served as a French guarantee for the peace. On 30 November 1712 Thomas Chudleigh became colonel. In 1713 the regiment was then disbanded, but in 1715 it was resurrected under the same colonel.

Earl of Donegal; 35th Foot

When the international tension increased in 1701 Arthur Chichester Earl of Donegal got a commission to raise a regiment in June or July40. The regiment was part of the expedition to Cadiz where it was in the third line that landed. From there the Donegal regiment continued to the West Indies40b. The Donegal regiment returned to Ireland in October 1703. The Earl of Donegal was succeeded by Richard Gorges of Kilbrew (1662-1728) on 15 April 1706. In 1707 the Gorges regiment was in the Battle of Almansa.

William Caulfield Viscount Charlemont; 36th Foot

On 28 June 1701 William Caulfield 2nd Viscount Charlemont41 was commissioned to raise a new regiment in Ireland41b. In 1702 the Charlemont regiment was designated for Sea Service. In June 1702 the regiment arrived on the Isle of Whight and in July it sailed for Cadiz. On 12 August the regiment arrived before Cadiz and participated in the ineffectual attempts to capture the city. Afterwards the regiment was part of an expedition to the West Indies under Commodore Walker. In October 1703 the regiment arrived back in Ireland with heavy losses due to disease41c. This was probably the reason that it stayed in Ireland for some time. In April 1705 the Charlemont regiment embarked in Ireland to join the fleet under the Earl of Peterborough. This fleet then made an attempt on Barcelona and Charlemont distinguished himself in command at the capture of Monjuich. It's then not clear whether the regiment remained in Barcelona up till the French siege of the city or was outside. Viscount Charlemont was removed by Peterborough and on 10 May 1706 he was succeeded by Lt-Colonel Thomas Alnutt. In 1707 the regiment moved to Valencia and was in the Battle of Almansa. At Almansa most of the regiment was captured. After arriving back in England Colonel Alnutt was to raise the regiment anew. Somewhat later Colonel Thomas Alnutt died and was replaced by Archibald Earl of Ilay (later Duke of Argyle), who was appointed on 23 March 1709. The Earl of Ilay later resigned and was replaced by Henry Desaulnais (Desney) on 23 March 1709. In 1711 the Desney regiment was part of the ill-faited expedition to Canada. After that it arrived back in Portsmouth on 9 October 1711. On 7 July 1712 the Desnay regiment sailed and occupied Dunkirk the next day, which was a guarantee for the peace. In spring 1714 the regiment sailed to England, and from there it proceeded to Ireland and was placed on that establishment. After moving to another regiment Desney was succeeded by William Egerton on 11 July 1715.

Thomas Meredith; 37th Foot

Thomas Meredith's got a commission to raise a regiment in March 170242. In September 1702 orders were given to pay him 500 pounds for his regiment newly raised in Ireland. In 1704 the Meredith regiment was in the battle of Blenheim. On 29 May 1705 the battalion was near Trier. In 1710 Colonel Meredith became Colonel of the regiment which was later the 21st.

Luke Lillingston; 38th Foot

This regiment claimed to be descended from a regiment raised by Sir John Guise in 1688. He was succeeded by Jonathan Foulkes. We then have a Colonel Foulkes regiment in November 1692. In December 1693 Colonel Foulkes was either death or had resigned. In November 1694 Colonel 'Fulkes' was replaced by Colonel Lillingston. We then have a Colonel Lillingston's regiment in October 1696, but after that I've found nothing.

In February 1702 Lillingston got a commission to raise a new regiment43. He was later succeeded by James Jones in 1708 and Francis Alexander in 1711.

Richard Coote; 39th Foot

In February 1702 Richard Coote was appointed as colonel of a regiment which was being raised in Ireland44. The regiment did claim origins in a regiment commanded by Lisburne. This would be true if one can relate the officers of the regiment at the time it was disbanded in 1699 to the officers when the regiment was possibly resurrected. I cannot make this comparison, but here are the captains of the Coote regiment in 1699: Colonel Coote; Lt-col Thomas Allen; Major Francis Holroyd; Ralph Bren; Stephen Caple; Robert Houston; William Adaire; Loftus Duckingfield; William Harrison; Dudly Loftus; Francis Toplady; William Rutter and Perkins Vaughan44b. For the moment I will not dwell on this.

So we have the Coot regiment in 1702. In March 1703 Colonel Coot died in Chester44c. In March 1703 he was succeeded by Colonel Nicholas Sankey44d. In 1704 the regiment went to Portugal and then to Spain and Almansa.

Thomas Stringer's

In February 1702 Thomas Stringer got an appointment to raise a new regiment45. In September 1702 it was ordered to Ireland and to be put on that establishment. On 28 May 1705 the regiment was near Trier. In September 1706 Thomas Stringer died of a fever45b. He was succeeded by James Campbell Duke of Argyll45c. As seen above the Duke of Argyll became colonel of the later 3rd Foot on 25 February 1707 and thus left this regiment. He was succeeded by the Earl of Orrery45d. When Orrery moved to the 21st in 1711 Sybourg became colonel of this regiment.

Lord Mohun

In June 1702 Lord Mohun's regiment had been ordered to Ireland46. In September 1702 the orders to place it on the Irish establishment were confirmed. In May 1706 this regiment was at Barcelona. In August 1706 the regiment participated in the capture of Alicante

Richard Boyle Viscount Shannon marines

The Viscount Shannon was appointed colonel of one of the newly raised regiments of marines in February 1702. In June 1702 the regiment was on the Isle of Whight, where it was reviewed by Prince George47. The Shannon regiment then sailed in the expedition to Cadiz, where it landed in the third line on 15 August 170247b.

Richard Temple

In February 1702 Richard Temple was appointed as colonel to raise a new regiment48. In September 1702 this regiment was ordered to Ireland and to be brought on that establishment47b.

Henry Mordaunt Marines

In April 1699 the House of Commons was presented with a list of the officers of the four regiments King William III had tried to 'hide' on the Navy establishment as Marines. For Colonel Henry Mordaunt's regiment these were: Col. Henry Mordaunt; Lt.-Col Jos. Johnson, Major Edw. Norton; Captains: Lewis Mordaunt; Richard Pye; Const. Ligneir; Fran. Russan; Edward Woodcock; Nich. de La Noe; Hugh Deane; John Brewerton; Samuel Foster; Tho. Somner49x.

In February 1702 Henry Mordaunt was appointed as colonel of a new regiment of marines49. It's then of course interesting to know whether this new regiment was in fact the same as his old regiment. The captains of this new regiment were: Col. Harry Mordaunt (match), Lt-Col Lewis Mordaunt (captain in the old), Major Aspin (new), captains: Pye (match), De Ligniere (match), Rufane (probably Russan), De la Noe (match), Dean (match), Sumner (match), S. Forster (match) and Benedict (capt-lieutenant in the old regiment). We can therefore draw the conclusion that this was in fact the same regiment as regards the officers. In May 1702 five companies of this new regiment were already in service49b. In September 1702 the still incomplete Mordaunt regiment with the colonel's brother Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis Mordaunt was in Jersey49c. Because the regiment was rather permanently in Jersey the status of the regiment was changed from a Marine regiment to a regular one on 23 March 170349d.

Henry Holt Marines

In March 1702 Henry Holt became colonel of a new regiment of Marines. These were the captains of this Marine regiment: Col Holt; Lt-Col. Rodney; Major Nott; Captains: Ganspoule; Gore; Lysle; de Sediere; Dahlem; Manley; Phillips and Pluncket50.

Viscount Mountjoy

Somewhere about July 1701 Viscount Mountjoy got a commission to raise a regiment50b. William Stewart second Viscount of Mountjoy (1675-10 Jan 1728) had earlier also been colonel of a regiment, but that had been disbanded after the peace of Rijswijk.

John Erskine Earl of Mar

In 1701 some regiments had been sent from Scotland to Holland. In May 1702 John Erskine Earl of Mar therefore got a commission to raise a small regiment of nine companies with only 27 soldiers each51.

Strathnaver

In 1701 some regiments had been sent from Scotland to Holland. In May 1702 the Master of Strathnaver therefore got a commission to raise a new regiment. This was probably also a regiment of only nine companies.

Past 1 January 1703 regiments

George Maccartney

In 1704 George Maccartney received a commission to raise regiment100.

Charles Boyle Earl of Orerry

When Lionel Earl of Orrery died in August 1703 Charles Boyle became Earl of Orrery and had a regiment101. The date of his appointment was 1 March 1704101a. Orerry seems to have been succeeded by Sir Thomas Pendergrasse in June 1707101b. Thomas Pendergrasse was killed in the Battle of Malplaquet101c. He was succeeded by Colonel Corbet101d. Later on the same source does however state that this regiment was given to Major General Macartney101e in January 1710101f. In December 1710 Maccartney was allowed to dispose of his regiment, but I could not find who succeeded him.

Colonel Evans

In March 1703 Evans got the commission to raise a new regiment102.

Colonel Elliot

In March 1703 Elliot got the commission to raise a new regiment103. In 1705 the Elliot regiment was part of Peterborough's fleet that went to Spain.

Scottish Garrisons

There was also an overview of Scottish Garrisons110

  • The regiment at Fort William, this was a small garrison of about 300 men
  • Edinburgh Castle Garrison, 145 men
  • Stirling Castle Garrison, 117 men
  • Dumbarton Castle Garrison, 59 men
  • Blackness Garrsion, 3 men

Sources for English Infantry Regiments

There are some major online sources for information about English Infantry Regiments. The first are of course the online resources Google Book search and the Internet Archive. The House of Commons Journal is a great resource available online at British History Online , see under parliamentary. For snippets of contemporary information about the regiments one can research: A brief historical relation of State Affairs from September 1678 to April 1714 by Luttrell, de Europische Mercurius (In Dutch) or The History of Queen Anne by Abel Boyer which are all available online at Google Booksearch (though the Mercurius not completely).

Notes

0)
18) For an older account of Killiecrankie see: The last days of Dundee, in the Dublin University Magazine V. 19 Jan. - June 1842 page 479
18b) A Brief relation etc. by Luttrel has this message about Sir John Jacob's appointment under 19 March 1695.
18c) State Papers domestic under 15 March 1702 has Barrymore succeeding John Jacob.
19) For Tidcombe's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1837, The Fourteenthe, or , regiment of foot.
20) Brief relation of State Affairs by Luttrell under 27 March: 'Col. Maccarty is said to have the regiment that Admiral Herbert had.' Also in the Ellis correspondence in a letter of 29 March 1687 this claim is made.
20a) Sackville Tufton (1646- 1721) to him is acribed: 'The History of Faction, alias hypocrisy, alias moderation, from its first rise, down to its present toleration in these kingdoms'.
20b) The Ellis correspondence in a letter of 19 April 1687 has Sackville Tufton's apointment.
20c) Emanuel Scrope Howe (after 1661 - 26 September 1709) fourth son of John Grubham Howe and Annabella Scrope. Brigadier-General on 9 March 1703, Major-General on 10 May 1707.
20d) See Liste des trouppes et des Generaux employés au siege de la Citadelle de Tournay.
20e) For Charles sixth Duke of Somerset (12 August 1682 - 2 December 1748) see: Collin's Peerage of England London 1812 Volume 1 Page 184,
21) For Stanley's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1847, The Sixteenth, or The Bedfordshire Regiment of Foot.
21a) English Army Lists vol. 2, page 187 has Archibald Douglas' appointment as colonel of this new regiment.
22) For Bridge's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1847, The Seventeenth, or The Lancastershire Regiment of Foot.
22b) In the British army and others there were also colonels who did not own a regiment, and obviously Wightman was one of them. He later became a full colonel of the regiment and he also published an account of the battle of Almansa.
23) For Frederick Hamilton's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1847, The Eighteenth, or the Royal Irish Regiment of Foot.
23b) The correspondence of Henry Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, and his brother. A Letter from the Justices of Ireland to the Earl of Rochester of 20 March 1701 has that Frederick Hamilton's regiment was in Charles Fort.
24) Francis Luttrell of Dunster Castle (in Somerset) (1659 - 25 July 1690) is not to be confused with the Colonels Simon and Henry Luttrell who fought on the side of James II.
24b) A Brief relation etc. under July 1690 has Francis Luttrell's death.
24c) A Brief relation etc. under 12 January 1691: His majestie hath been pleased to give col. Earl that regiment of foot that was lately col. Luttrells..
24d) The History of Queen Anne has the 'Earl' regiment sent to the West Indies in September 1702.
25) House of Commons Journal Vol. 10 14 March 1689, which is about the charges for the invasion: and also the raising of the regiments of the Right Honourable the Lord Mordaun, Sir Rob. Peyton, and Sir John Guise.
25b) Gustavus Hamilton (? - 16 Sep. 1723) later Viscount Boyne, son of Sir Frederick Hamilton Governor of Ulster and a heiress of Sir John Vaughan. He is not to be confused with Gustavus Hamilton governor of Enniskillen, who was a son of Colonel Ludowick Hamilton and a Swedish lady.
25c) The History of the Reign of Queen: digested into annals 1703, The appendix page 11 under A particular account of the Land Forces, has Gust. Hamilton's regiment
26) For Row's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1847, The Twenty-first, or Royal North British Fusiliers Regiment of Foot.
26b) The Political State of Great Britain Vol. I page 148 has that Orrery succeeded Meredith in about January 1711
26c) Luttrell V. 6 Under 1711 has: 'The earl of Orrery has the regiment given him which was lieutenant general Meredith's.
27) For Hendesyde's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1847, The Twenty-second, or Cheshire Regiment of Foot.
28) The history of the Town and county of Galway, page 162 has Colonel Herbert's regiment entering Galway.
28b) Europische Mercurius 1691, Part III page 9 about colonel Herbert getting killed at Aughrim
28c) The Green Book, or, Gleanings from the writing desk of a literary Agitator by John Cornelius O'Callaghan Esq. Dublin 1845, Page 202 for Purcell then being Lieutenant-colonel of Herbert's regiment.
28d) House of Commons Journal vol. 10 for 9 November 1691 has the designation Regiment late Col. Herbert's
28e) House of Commons Journal vol. 10 for 25 November 1692 has the designation Sir John Morgan's late Herbert's
28f) House of Commons Journal vol. 11 for 5 December 1693 has the designation Colonel Engoldsby's late Sir John Morgan's.
28g) Europische Mercurius for 1711, under August 1711 page 151 has Sabine's regiment at the Siege of Bouchain.
29) The visitation of the County of Kent taken in the year 1619 by John Philipott London 1863, page 118: 'Sir Edward Dering Bartt was buried November ye 23th 1690: who died at Dundalk in Ireland October the 15th 1689.
29b) The Green book, or Gleanings from the writing desk of a literary agitator, by O'callahan Boston 1849, page 185 states that Deering's regiment was in garrison at the time.
29c) A Brief Hisorical relation by Luttrell under 14 June 1694, page 329 has Colonel Venner killed in the Brest expediton.
30) The History of England, from the revolution of 1688, to the death of George the second Philadelphia 1836, page 23 has the meeting of the convention and on page 24 Leven's appointment.
31) For the Cameronian regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1837, The twenty-sixth, or Cameronian, regiment of foot.
32) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 has the appointment of Thomas Whetham as colonel of Tiffin's regiment.
33) House of Commons Journal for 11 March 1699.
33b) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 363 has Gibson's officers.
33c) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 248 has Gibson's regiment changing to Ireland.
33d) Collin's Peerage of England London 1812 volume 3, page 689 for Andrews Windsor.
33e) Luttrell V. 6 under 25 May 1710 has: 'Lieutenant general Meredith has the regiment of the late lord Mordant, and not colonel Dixey Windsor, as formerly mentioned.
34) The House of Commons 1690-1715 Cambridge 2002 page 1021 for Colonel Thomas Farrington.
35) House of Commons Journal vol. 11 for 3 December 1695 has the regiment as Colonel Saunderson's, late Castleton's
35b) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 under 10 March 1702 for a list of officers of Thomas Saunderson's regiment of Marines.
36) A Genealogical and heraldic History of the extinct and dormant baronetcies by John Burke second edition London 1841 page 27 has a colonel Sir Richard Atkins baron of Clapham dead on 28 November 1696.
36b) Luttrell: page 150 under 8 December 1696: 'The regiment of the late Sir Richard Atkins is given to coll. George Villiers'
36c) House of Commons Journal volume 12 11 March 1699 for the officers of Northcote's disbanded regiment
36d) Calendar of State Papers domestic for 1702 page 364 for the officers of George Villiers' regiment of Marines
36e) Luttrell under 19 February 1706: Coll. Luttrell has resigned his regiment to lieutenant coll. Churchil of Evans regiment.'
37) Luttrell under 1 August 1699: 'Collonel Collingwood, who went with his regiment to the Leeward Islands, is dead there; as also his lady and daughter, with many of his fficers and soldiers.'
37b) The History of the reign of Queen Anne Vol. 1 has under June 1702 that the 'newly rais'd regiment of Colonel Fox did very well at the review.
37c) The History of the reign of Queen Anne page 163 has Borr's appointment and that he was before lieutenant-colonel of Fox's regiment.
38) Luttrell under 10 February 1702 has the appointments of new regiments for: Farington, Mordaunt, Coot, Holt, Fox, Saunderson, Gibson, Villiers, Stringer, Evans, Lillingston, Huntingdon and Richard Temple.
38b) Calendar of State Papers Domestic for 1702 page 364 for Huntingdon's officers.
38c) Luttrell under 2 March 1703 has the appintment of Colonel Leigh.
38d) The Europische Mercurius has 'Dunkinson' wounded in this siege under a July 1705 heading.
38e) The history of the reign of Queen Anne vol. 4 page 131: His tercia was followed by the English regiment commanded by Colonel Duncasson, who received a mortal wound.
39) For Lucas' regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1837, The thirty fourth, or the Cumberland, regiment of foot.
40) Luttrell has under 19 July 1701: 'And the Lords Drogheda, Montjoy and Donegall have commissions for raising reigments in room of those sent for Holland'
40b) The History of the Reign of Queen Anne under September 1702 has Donegal's regiment sent to the West Indies.
41) For William Caulfield second Viscount of Charlemont see: Biographia Hibernica voulme 1 by Richard Ryan London 1821 page 391.
41b) For the Charlemont's regiment see (unless otherwise stated): Historical Records of the British Army London 1837, The Thirty-sixth, or the Herefordshire, regiment of foot.
41c) Luttrell under 26 October 1703: The regiments of Columbine, Earl, Gustavus Hamilton, Donegall, and Charlemont are come to Ireland from the West Indies, being reduced to half their number by death.
42) Calendar of State Papers under 13 March 1702: 'We have ordered two regiments of foot to be at once raised in Ireland for active service, ...and are to be commanded by Col. Richard Coote and Col. Thos. Meredyth.'
43) Luttrell under 10 February 1702 has the appointments of new regiments for: Farington, Mordaunt, Coot, Holt, Fox, Saunderson, Gibson, Villiers, Stringer, Evans, Lillingston, Huntingdon and Richard Temple.
44) Calendar of State Papers under 13 March 1702: 'We have ordered two regiments of foot to be at once raised in Ireland for active service, ...and are to be commanded by Col. Richard Coote and Col. Thos. Meredyth.'
44b) See House of Commons Journal for 11 March 1699 for Coote's officers when the regiment was disbanded.
44c) Luttrell has under 27 March 1703: Colonel Coot is dead at Chester'
44d) Luttrell under 1 April 1703: 'The regiment of late collonel Coot is given to collonel Sankey'
45) Luttrell under 10 February 1702 has the appointments of new regiments for: Farington, Mordaunt, Coot, Holt, Fox, Saunderson, Gibson, Villiers, Stringer, Evans, Lillingston, Huntingdon and Richard Temple.
45b) The history of the township of Meltham, near Huddersfield' by the late Rev. Joseph Hughes, London 1866 refers to 'Le Neve p. 120' in saying that: Colonel Thomas Stringer died of a fever in his coach as he was going from Courtray in Flanders, September 1706.
45c) Luttrell V. 6 under 17 September 1706 has that Colonel Stringer was succeeded by the Duke of Argyle.
45d) Luttrell V. 6 under 13 March 1707 has: 'The Duke of Argyle haveing got general Churchills late regiment, the earl of Orrery is made collonel of his grace's.'
46) Calendar of State Papers page 248 for Lord Mohun's regiment being ordered to Ireland in 1702
47) The History of the reign of Queen Anne Vol. 1 has under June 1702 that the 'newly rais'd regiment of Lord Shanon did very well at the review.
47b) The History of the reign of Queen Anne Vol. 1 has under August 1702 that 'Shannon's regiment was in the third line at the landing.
48) Luttrell under 10 February 1702 has the appointments of new regiments for: Farington, Mordaunt, Coot, Holt, Fox, Saunderson, Gibson, Villiers, Stringer, Evans, Lillingston, Huntingdon and Richard Temple.
48b) Calendar of State Papers page 248 for Temple's regiment moved to Ireland and placed on that establishment.
49x) House of Commons Journal V. 12 under 20 April 1699 has the officers of the to be disbanded regiment of Henry Mordaunt.
49) Luttrell under 10 February 1702 has the appointment of a new regiment for Mordaunt and others.
49b) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 61 has five companies of Mordaunt's new regiment in a letter by colonel Collier to Nottingham.
49c) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 246 has the incomplete Mordaunt regiment in Jersey.
49d) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 644 has Mordaunt's regiment losing its marine status to Seymour's on 23 March 1703
50) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 363 has the officers of Holt's new regiment.
50b) Luttrell has under 19 July 1701: 'And the Lords Drogheda, Montjoy and Donegall have commissions for raising reigments in room of those sent for Holland'
51) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 462-464
52) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 462-464
100) The Georgian era page 30 has that George Maccartney got a commission to raise a regiment in 1704.
101) The History of the reign of Queen Anne second year (1703) printed London 1704 appendix page 22.
101a) Peerage of England London 1812 vol VII page 190: (Orrery).. had the command of a regiment of foot conferred on him 1 March 1703-1704
101b) Luttrell V. 6 under 12 June 1707 has: 'Sir Thomas Pendergrasse has the regiment given him which the late Lord Orrery lately commanded.'
101c) Luttrell V. 6 under 6 September 1709 has that Sir Thomas Pendergrasse was killed.
101d) Luttrell V. 6 under 1 Novmeber 1709 has that the regiment of Sir Thomas Pendergrasse was given to colonel Corbet.
101e) Luttrell V. 6 under 14 January 1710 has the regiment given to Macartney.
102) Luttrell V. 6 under 4 March 1703 has the appointment of Evans as colonel of a regiment of Foot.
103) Luttrell V. 6 under 4 March 1703 has the appointment of Evans as colonel of a regiment of Foot.
110) Calendar of State Papers for 1702 page 69 and 70 for the Scottish Garrisons.